Desexing

The decision of desexing or neutering (castration in male animals and spaying in female animals) will in many instances be quite simple. Most family pets will be more content and easier to care for after they have been desexed.

It would be wrong to consider this is an emotional issue for our pets and should be viewed purely as a practical option to enhance the ownership of our pets and in some cases keep them healthy.

Benefits of desexing male animals:

  • Will lose their desire to find and mate with females
  • This will mean they are easier to keep within your property
  • Male animals will no longer be prone to testicular cancers
  • Male dogs will be very unlikely to develop inflammatory prostatitis after desexing ( this is testosterone driven)
  • If male dogs develop cancers or hyperplastic prostate disease we will often need to castrate them in their senior years
  • Council registration is reduced for desexed pets

Benefits of desexing female animals:

  • They will not come into season seeking males
  • Easier to keep in your property
  • Less risk of injury/harm and even hit by cars if escape to search out males
  • Will not be prone to ovarian cancer or ovarian disease as their ovaries are removed
  • Will not require later life hysterectomy due to endometritis or pyometra ( infection of the womb/uterus)
  • Council registration is reduced for desexed pets.

Dogs

Desexing of both male and female dogs is recommended before they reach sexual maturity. Some vets will recommend early desexing at 12 - 16 weeks of age, while others prefer to perform the operation at an older age such as 5 to 6 months of age. It is best to ask your own vet and be guided by their preference. Desexing of female dogs (spaying) will prevent unwanted puppies or the annoying attention of male dogs when they come into season twice a year. From a medical standpoint, spaying at a young age will prevent mammary tumours (breast cancer) and pyometra (infection of the uterus which is often a surgical emergency). Neutering, or castration, of male dogs before puberty will decrease the problems of aggression, urine marking, tendency to roam, and hypersexuality (usually with the furniture or with visitors!) seen in entire male dogs. Medically, castrated dogs cannot develop testicular cancer, and reduces the risk of prostate problems in the older dog. Desexing your dog has many advantages.

Cats

Desexing of both males and females is recommended before the onset of puberty, generally around 5 - 6 months of age. Some vets will recommend earlier desexing from 12 - 16 weeks of age. It is best to ask your own vet and be guided by their preference. Spaying of female cats will prevent unwanted pregnancies, the annoying attention of roaming tomcats, and spaying at a young age (before their first season) will prevent mammary tumours (breast cancer) and pyometra (infection of the uterus which is often a surgical emergency). Neutering, or castration, of male cats before puberty will decrease the problems of aggression, urine marking, fighting and the tendency to roam (decreasing the risk of being lost or hit by a car). Medically, castrated cats cannot develop testicular cancer. Your vet will be able to give you the best advice on what age your kitten should be desexed.

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Sat: 8.30am - 4.00pm
Sun: Closed
Public hols: Closed

07 3264 1222

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Find us at 739 Albany Creek Road, Albany Creek (on the roundabout opposite McDonalds).

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